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JANE AUSTEN's Rogue Gallery



Below is a look at the fictional rogues - male and female - created by Jane Austen in the six published novels written by her. So, without further ado . . .


JANE AUSTEN'S ROGUE GALLERY



John Willoughby - "Sense and Sensibility" (1811)

John Willoughby is a handsome young single man with a small estate, but has expectations of inheriting his aunt's large estate. Also, Willoughby driven by the his own pleasures, whether amusing himself with whatever woman crossed his path, or via marrying in order to obtain wealth to fuel his profligate ways. He does not value emotional connection and is willing to give up Marianne Dashwood, his true love, for more worldly objects. Although not my favorite rogue, I feel that Willoughby is Austen's most successful rogue, because he was able to feel remorse and regret for his rejection of Marianne by the end of the story. This makes him one of Austen's most complex rogues. Here are the actors that portrayed John Willoughby:



1. Clive Francis (1971) - I must admit that originally, I did not find him particularly memorable as Willoughby. In fact, my memories of his performance was very vague. But recent viewings of the 1971 miniseries made me finally appreciate his subtle and very effective performance.





2. Peter Woodward (1981) - I first became aware of Woodward during his brief stint on the sci-fi series, "CRUSADE". He was also slightly memorable as Willoughby, although I did not find his take on the character as particularly roguish. His last scene may have been a bit hammy, but otherwise, I found him tolerable.




3. Greg Wise (1995) - He was the first actor I saw portray Willoughby . . . and he remains my favorite. His Willoughby was both dashing and a little bit cruel. And I loved that he managed to conveyed the character's regret over rejecting Marianne without any dialogue whatsoever.





4. Dominic Cooper (2008) - Many television critics made a big deal about his portrayal of Willoughby, but I honestly did not see the magic. However, I must admit that he gave a pretty good performance, even if his Willoughby came off as a bit insidious at times.






George Wickham - "Pride and Prejudice" (1813)

George Wickham is an old childhood friend of hero Fitzwilliam Darcy and the son of the Darcy family's steward, whose dissipate ways estranged the pair. He is introduced into the story as a handsome and superficially charming commissioned militia officer in Meryton, who quickly charms and befriends the heroine, Elizabeth Bennet, after learning of her dislike of Darcy. Wickham manages to charm the entire Meryton neighborhood, before they realize that they have a snake in their midst. Elizabeth eventually learns of Wickham's attempt to elope with the young Georgiana Darcy. Unfortunately, he manages to do the same with her younger sister, Lydia, endangering the Bennet family's reputation. He could have been the best of Austen's rogues, if it were not for his stupid decision to elope with Lydia, a young woman whose family would be unable to provide him with a well-endowed dowry. Because I certainly cannot see him choosing him as a traveling bed mate, while he evade creditors. Here are the actors that portrayed George Wickham:




1. Edward Ashley-Cooper (1940) - This Australian actor was surprisingly effective as the smooth talking Wickham. He was handsome, charming, witty and insidious. I am surprised that his portrayal is not that well known.





2. Peter Settelen (1980) - He made a charming Wickham, but his performance came off as a bit too jovial for me to take him seriously as a rogue.





3. Adrian Lukis (1995) - His Wickham is, without a doubt, is my favorite take on the character. He is not as handsome as the other actors who have portrayed the role; but he conveyed all of the character's attributes with sheer perfection.





4. Rupert Friend (2005) - I think that he was hampered by director Joe Wright's script and failed to become an effective Wickham. In fact, I found his portrayal almost a waste of time.






Henry Crawford - "Mansfield Park" (1814)

I think that one of the reasons I have such difficulties in enjoying "MANSFIELD PARK" is that I found Austen's portrayal of the roguish Henry Crawford rather uneven. He is originally portrayed as a ladies' man who takes pleasure in seducing women. But after courting heroine Fanny Price, he falls genuinely in love with her and successfully manages to mend his ways. But Fanny's rejection of him (due to her love of cousin Edmund Bertram) lead him to begin an affair with Edmund's sister, Maria Rushworth and is labeled permanently by Austen as a reprobate. This entire storyline failed to alienate me toward Henry. I just felt sorry for him, because Fanny was not honest enough to reveal why she had rejected him. Here are the actors that portrayed Henry Crawford:




1. Robert Burbage (1983) - As I had stated in a review of the 1983 miniseries, I thought his take on Henry Crawford reminded me of an earnest schoolboy trying to act like a seducer. Sorry, but I was not impressed.




2. Alessandro Nivola (1999) - In my opinion, his portrayal of Henry was the best. He managed to convey the seductive qualities of the character, his gradual transformation into an earnest lover and the anger he felt at being rejected. Superb performance.




3. Joseph Beattie (2007) - His performance was pretty solid and convincing. However, there were a few moments when his Henry felt more like a stalker than a seducer. But in the end, he gave a pretty good performance.






Mary Crawford - "Mansfield Park" (1814)

Ah yes! Mary Crawford. I never could understand why Jane Austen eventually painted her as a villainess (or semi-villainess) in "MANSFIELD PARK". As the sister of Henry Crawford, she shared his tastes for urbane airs, tastes, wit (both tasteful and ribald) and an interest in courtship. She also took an unexpected shine to the shy Fanny Price, while falling in love with the likes of Edmund Bertram. However, Edmund planned to become a clergyman, something she could not abide. Mary was not perfect. She could be superficial at times and a bit too manipulative for her own good. If I must be honest, she reminds me too much of Dolly Levi, instead of a woman of low morals. Here are the actresses who portrayed Mary Crawford:





1. Jackie Smith-Wood (1983) - She gave a delightful and complex performance as Mary Crawford. I practically found myself wishing that "MANSFIELD PARK" had been a completely different story, with her as the heroine. Oh well. We cannot have everything.




2. Embeth Davidtz (1999) - Her portrayal of Mary was just as delightful and complex as Smith-Wood. Unfortunately for the actress, writer-director Patricia Rozema wrote a scene that featured a ridiculous and heavy-handed downfall for Mary. Despite that, she was still superb and held her own against Frances O'Connor's more livelier Fanny.




3. Hayley Atwell (2007) - After seeing her performance as Mary, I began to suspect that any actress worth her salt can do wonders with the role. This actress was one of the bright spots in the 2007 lowly regarded version of Austen's novel. Mind you, her portrayal was a little darker than the other two, but I still enjoyed her portrayal.





Frank Churchill - "Emma" (1815)

Frank Churchill was the son of one of Emma Woodhouse's neighbors by a previous marriage. He was an amiable young man whom everyone, except Mr. George Knightley, who considered him quite immature. After his mother's death he was raised by his wealthy aunt and uncle, whose last name he took. Frank may be viewed simply as careless, shallow, and little bit cruel in his mock disregard for his real fiancee, Jane Fairfax. But I find it difficult to view him as a villain. Here are the actors who portrayed Frank Churchill:



1. Robert East (1972) - It is hard to believe that this actor was 39-40 years old, when he portrayed Frank Churchill in this miniseries. He did a pretty good job, but there were a few moments when his performance seemed a bit uneven.




2. Ewan McGregor (1996) - He did a pretty good job, but his performance was hampered by Douglas McGrath's script, which only focused upon Frank's efforts to hide his engagement to Jane Fairfax.





3. Raymond Coulthard (1996-97) - In my opinion, he gave the best performance as Frank. The actor captured all of the character's charm, humor, and perversity on a very subtle level.




4. Rupert Evans (2009) - He was pretty good as Frank, but there were times when his performance became a little heavy-handed, especially in later scenes that featured Frank's frustrations in hiding his engagement to Jane Fairfax.





John Thorpe - "Northanger Abbey" (1817)

I would view John Thorpe as Jane Austen's least successful rogue. I do not if I could even call him a rogue. He seemed so coarse, ill-mannered and not very bright. With his flashy wardrobe and penchant for mild profanity, I have doubts that he could attract any female, including one that was desperate for a husband. And his joke on Catherine Moreland seemed so . . . unnecessary. Here are the actors that portrayed John Thorpe:




1. Jonathan Coy (1986) - He basically did a good job with the character he was given. Although there were moments when his John Thorpe seemed more like an abusive stalker than the loser he truly was.




2. William Beck (2007) - I admit that physically, he looks a little creepy. But the actor did a first-rate job in portraying Thorpe as the crude loser he was portrayed in Austen's novel.





Isabella Thorpe - "Northanger Abbey" (1817)

The lovely Isabella Thorpe was a different kettle of fish than her brother. She had ten times the charms and probably the brains. Her problem was that her libido brought her down the moment she clapped eyes on Captain Frederick Tilney. And this is what ended her friendship with heroine Catherine Moreland, considering that she was engaged to the latter's brother. Here are the actresses who portrayed Isabella Thorpe:




1. Cassie Stuart (1986) - She did a pretty good job as Isabella, even if there were moments when she came off as a bit . . . well, theatrical. I only wish that the one of the crew had taken it easy with her makeup.




2. Carey Mulligan (2007) - She gave a first-rate performance as Isabella, conveying all of the character's charm, intelligence and weaknesses. It was a very good performance.





William Elliot - "Persuasion" (1818)

William Elliot is a cousin of heroine Anne Elliot and the heir presumptive of her father, Sir Walter. He became etranged from the family when he wed a woman of much lower social rank, for her fortune. Sir Walter and Elizabeth had hoped William would marry the latter. After becoming a widower, he mended his relationship with the Elliots and attempted to court Anne in the hopes of inheriting the Elliot baronetcy and ensuring that Sir Walter never marries Mrs. Penelope Clay, Elizabeth Elliot's companion. He was an interesting character, but his agenda regarding Sir Walter's title and estates struck me as irrelevant. Sir Walter could have easily found another woman to marry and conceive a male heir. "PERSUASION" could have been a better story without a rogue/villain. Here are the actors that portrayed William Elliot:




1. David Savile (1971) - He made a pretty good William Elliot. However, there were times when his character switched from a jovial personality to a seductive one in an uneven manner.





2. Samuel West (1995) - His portrayal of William Elliot is probably the best I have ever seen. He conveyed all aspects of William's character - both the good and bad - with seamless skill. My only problem with his characterization is that the screenwriter made his William financial broke. And instead of finding another rich wife, this William tries to court Anne to keep a close eye on Sir Walter and Mrs. Clay. Ridiculous.




3. Tobias Menzies (2007) - I found his portrayal of William Elliot to be a mixed affair. There were moments that his performance seemed pretty good. Unfortunately, there were more wooden moments from the actor than decent ones.

Comments

( 5 comments — Leave a comment )
diana_dwight
Jul. 16th, 2011 07:15 am (UTC)
It must be quite unpleasant to live knowing that you have a roguish face. Or maybe rogues don't care what people think of them :-)
spally
Jul. 16th, 2011 07:42 am (UTC)
This was a great post and so cool that you included some of the female rogues - not just the male ones! :)

I heartily agree with your comments about Alessando Nivola, Haley Atwell and Care Mulligan. They were all superb.
evilgmbethy
Jul. 16th, 2011 08:43 am (UTC)
Love this post! Agree with you on who offered the best portrayals, as well. I absolutely hate the Kate Beckinsale Emma, but I do agree that Raymond Coulthard was the best Frank Churchill. I also think that version had the best Jane Fairfax, as well. It's the Emma and Mr. Knightley that terrified me, haha. I do think Ewan McGregor could have done more with the role if the film hadn't been so condensed.

TOTALLY with you one Henry Crawford as well. I always had a hard time disliking him and seeing him as a true villain when he really was very ill-treated by Fanny. Then again, I've always found Fanny to be Austen's most unlikable heroine by far.

Dominic Cooper (2008) - Many television critics made a big deal about his portrayal of Willoughby, but I honestly did not see the magic. However, I must admit that he gave a pretty good performance, even if his Willoughby came off as a bit insidious at times.

I had no idea he'd gotten such strong reviews. I did not care for his version of Willoughby at all. He was too obviously slimy and sleazy. Greg Wise's Willoughby was fantastic; I could completely understand not just how Marianne fell for him, but also how Mrs. Dashwood fell for him too. He was charming, dashing, and all the appearances of the romantic hero that Willoughby should be. He was good at deceiving everyone, Cooper's portrayal of Willoughby was not at all how I see the character.

Adrian Lukis (1995) - His Wickham is, without a doubt, is my favorite take on the character. He is not as handsome as the other actors who have portrayed the role; but he conveyed all of the character's attributes with sheer perfection.

COMPLETELY agreed here, too. His Wickham is absolutely perfect, though there's very little about that version of P&P that isn't perfect. I like how when Lizzy calls him on his deception, he just smiles, all charm, and never really lets the facade drop. It's very convincing. Much like Greg Wise's Willoughy, I found myself taken in by Adrian Lukis' portrayal of Wickham.

Great post! Are you going to do other comparative casting posts?

sarahkatiejay
Jul. 16th, 2011 09:46 am (UTC)
Mary Crawford has one of the best lines of any JA novel; "Selfishness must always be forgiven, you know, for there's never any hope of a cure." . I'll always love Mary for that.

I think Jane enjoyed writing her rogues. SUCH FUN!

Edited at 2011-07-16 09:46 am (UTC)
elizzybright
Jul. 16th, 2011 06:19 pm (UTC)
Great list, I loved it!
( 5 comments — Leave a comment )

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